Contact

Let’s connect over tea and EPP!

If you would like further information about products from the Maker’s Stash range, or you have any questions regarding my English Paper Piecing patterns and kits, please fill out the form below.

If you would like to offer your invaluable support for my creative work, you can become a member of my Slow Stitching Journal over on Patreon.  Here I share with you behind-the-scenes content about my little business, what I’m making and what is inspiring me. You will gain access to tutorials, tips and tricks, discount codes, and free patterns.
I am passionate about Slow Stitching, English Paper Piecing, textile art, and creative living. As a member, you are subscribing to my own little virtual magazine where I can share my musings and a peek into my creative life. Sign Up here.

Would you like to receive a lovely letter from me each month as well as being the first to know about new Patterns and Products in the shop? Sign up for my monthly Slow Stitching Letter here.

Head over to my YouTube channel for English Paper Piecing Tutorials. To see inspiring English Paper Piecing quilts and slow stitching creations be sure to check out The Maker’s Stash on Pinterest and you can also follow me on Instagram and Facebook.

Would you like to connect we other Slow Stitchers and grow a community of like-minded friends? Join The Maker’s Stash Facebook Group here.

A note to UK Customers: due to the requirement for me to charge VAT, I have made the decision to no longer sell items from my website to UK customers. If you would like to purchase any of my patterns or kits, you can do so through my Etsy Shop. You will still be charge VAT, but Etsy take care of collecting and forwarding the tax to the Uk government, which means one less thing for me to worry about! If there is something specific in my web shop you would like to purchase, please send me a message and I can do a custom listing for you in my Etsy Shop. 

Want to get in touch with me? Contact me by email, phone or the contact form below.

Email: themakersstash@gmail.com

Phone: 61 414 543 858

English Paper Piecing

Product Categories

Best Sellers

Recent Blog Posts

Flicker Beat Mini Quilt

Flicker Beat Mini Quilt English Paper Piecing Pattern

This mini quilt was made back in 2018 but I have only just now released it as a pattern. My original quilt was made with a fat 16th bundle of Liberty Fabrics I received from Westwood Acres when I was a brand ambassador for them for a little while. From the bundle I pulled out 5 fabrics that I thought would look pretty together in a mini quilt design. I decided to pair them with some solid cotton and spot fabrics. I had wanted to try using a traditional quilt block design using the English Paper Piecing method for a while. I decided on the star block created from squares and half-square triangles.

For this quilt, I created nine 4″ star blocks. I cut the papers myself and worked out the best way to handpiece them all together to create the block. I used Electric Quilt 7 to draft the initial design and work out roughly what colours and fabrics would go where. I like working in this way sometimes as it allows me to play around with fabric and colour placement until I find the right combination.

When it came to making the mini quilt I first made all of the nine blocks. I then pieced them together in rows and then pieced the rows together. I used paper clips to hold my rows in place while I stitched them to prevent them from sliding and not lining up. I attached four hand-pieced borders to the quilt by making long strip templates out of 220gsm paper the size of the border I wanted. I then used my paper clips again to hold the borders in place while I stitched them on. Adding borders this way can be fiddly, but for small quilts like this I find it creates nice, neat and even borders. If I were to machine sew borders on I would need to be very accurate and work the machine slowly to ensure I pick up the quarter inch seam allowance properly and don’t leave any holes in the seam.

I am really please with this finished mini quilt. The large center squares mean you get to see a large part of the pretty Liberty print, even though the quilt is quite small. I decided to hand quilt using a single strand of white quilting cotton ‘in the ditch’ around every shape.

When it came to writing the pattern I actually tweaked the colour/fabric placement a little. That’s the fun part about re-visiting a project to write up the pattern. You have fresh eyes and can see where things could be improved to make them even better. The pattern includes a full colour piecing chart, block piecing instructions and charts, as well as step by step photo instructions for basting the shapes and piecing the block together. The pattern also includes a colouring -in chart so you can experiment with your own colour/fabric combination.

I am terrible at coming up with names for patterns. I put a call out on Instagram for name suggestions and I got lots of great ones. The only downside was that a lot of the names were already in use for other Quilt and Patchwork designs. I wanted the name to have something to do with Stars, so I looked up an online thesaurus and came across the word Flicker. I instantly connected it to the word beat as it reminded me of the Lorde song of the same name. I think the two words together work well to describe the quilt. The stars flicker through the quilt, standing out but receding at the same time. The whole design has a rhythm to it, like the stars and squares are dancing together to their own beat.

If you would like to make your own Flicker Beat Mini Quilt, you can find the pattern here. The PDF Pattern includes a supplement Printable Shape Template file. If you don’t want to cut your own papers, you can purchase a pre-cut paper template kit separately.

Flicker Beat Mini Quilt English Paper Piecing Pattern

I think this design would look equally good as a cushion and I have plans to make it again, possibly using only solid fabrics.

Happy Stitching,

Miss Leela x

How I Find Inspiration

Hi Stitchers,

I wanted to talk about inspiration with you today, how I find it, how I use it, how I share it and what it means to me to be able to inspire others.

So, what is ‘inspiration’? Google defines it as ‘the process of being mentally stimulated to do or feel something, especially to do something creative’ and ‘a sudden brilliant or timely idea’. Inspiration can certainly strike at any time and anywhere. For whatever reason, I find that many of my ideas are formulated while in the shower or late at night when I am trying to get to sleep…not the best time for inspiration to strike especially when your sleep is already interrupted throughout the night by a baby!

When we talk about inspiration, I do not think it just needs to be in a creative way. We can be inspired to make different life choices, to live more sustainably, we might be inspired by another person’s journey both physically and mentally. Almost all our ideas thought processes, and decisions are in some way directly or indirectly influenced by something that has inspired us.

In our digitally-driven world, these days we do not have to go very far to find inspiration, we do not even need to leave the couch! The invention of Pinterest 11 years ago gave everyone the ability to have a virtual inspiration board where you could ‘pin’ all manner of images and organize them on different boards. Pinterest allowed its users to save an image from a website to act as a reminder with a direct link of something they wanted to try for themselves. I am not sure how you felt when you discovered Pinterest, but I was ecstatic! I was a self-proclaimed ‘pretty image’ junkie and Pinterest meant I no longer had to save hundreds of inspiring images to my computer but rather save them to my own profile and pinboards.

Some of my Pinterest Boards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recently I have been inspired by Patchwork clothes and would love to make an EPP jacket.

 

It seems 2010 was the year for image-sharing platforms because a few months after Pinterest launched the world was introduced to Instagram. It is safe to say that this social media, photo-sharing platform has changed the way we share our lives and creations. We could choose to keep our little picture squares private or share them with the entire world! Instagram for me quickly became mostly about sharing what I was making. I started to discover other makers, hundreds, and hundreds of them, so many talented, creative makers to fill my feed with their pretty handmade items, so much inspiration! I found myself a community of makers that shared the same joy and passion for EPP and Slow Stitching as I did. I am inspired daily by my tribe, by my friends, not just with what they have made, but they inspire me and motivate me to keep working on my own creations and designs through their ‘hearts’ and comments on my posts.

It is easy in our fast pace, digital world to rely solely on these online resources for inspiration, but we must remember that there is a great big world out there and we should take time to smell the roses! Referring specifically to craft-based inspiration sources, I find visiting Quilt shows, craft fairs, and patchwork shops to be wonderfully inspiring. It also gives us the opportunity to chat and share our love for our craft with our fellow makers. Getting together at quilt guilds, sewing, and craft groups allows us to share what we are making and see what others are making, thus participating in an inspiration circle.

Another thing that can help to inspire a new make or design is quite simply fabric. Sometimes playing in my stash, pulling together a collection or scheme can get me inspired to create a new project. Much like mixing paints together for a painting, seeing what fabric plays well with another can help get the creative juices flowing.

Looking through my craft books and magazines can also help to inspire me. Aside from learning a new technique that might inspire a new project, they often just inspire me to start making something, to dive into my stash and crochet something fun or stitch something to hang in my home.

 

Beyond the world of craft, I find inspiration in many other areas. Having worked as an Interior Designer for 15 years, I have always found interiors, decorating, styling, home furnishings, homewares, and furniture inspiring. I draw on colour trends and styles, immersing them in what I create and design. I find architectural forms also inspiring, and I love searching for unique mosaic tile patterns that can be reinterpreted into EPP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes I can be inspired by simple little things, and often from nature. I love and adore flowers. Roses and peonies being my favorites. Cottage gardens also inspire me. Reading a good book can sometimes lead to new ideas as can watching films or Tv shows, in particular those with amazing cinematography, set, and costume design.

So, I have all this inspiring matter floating around me, how do I use it all?

My first step is to organize it. That involves Pinterest boards and Instagram ‘Saved’ folders. Depending on what project I am working on, I may create a visual mood or concept board. This helps me to narrow down the inspiration and focus on key elements.

I might hit the books or the internet to do some further research into a particular item of inspiration to learn more about the meaning or origins. Often what I find inspiring might be a new technique, such as an embroidery stitch, and so I will teach myself the new stitch and think about how I can incorporate it into what I am making.

Quite often inspiration serves as motivation. Seeing what everyone is making on Instagram inspires me to continue to work on my projects so that I can share them with my tribe and crafty community.

Sharing inspiration for me tends to happen in a digital way. I enjoy sharing what I am personally making on Instagram through my profile feed and the various video formats we now have. I like that I can ask for advice or get help to solve a design problem.

I enjoy curating my Pinterest boards and sharing these with my followers. I enjoy creating video tutorials that I share on my YouTube channel, and of course, this blog is a big way for me to share ideas and thoughts with you all to help educate and inspire.

 

I believe that it is important when sharing something you have made that has been inspired by another’s creative work to give credit to that maker. Sometimes it can be hard to come up with a fresh new idea for a pattern or design. Elements of your work may end up being similar to another’s without you ever intending it to be. There is a whole library out there of different traditional quilt blocks, motifs, embroidery stitches, and techniques. Many pattern designers draw on this library when designing a pattern, and so it can often be the case that the work by different designers can have the same or similar elements. I think it is important to be transparent, open, and honest about where we get our inspiration for what we create.

So how do I feel when someone says I have inspired them to try a new shape, or new pattern, or to try EPP? In a word, humbled. It brings me so much joy to know that the passion I have for EPP and Slow stitching inspires others. I am deeply passionate about traditional crafts and keeping them alive, moving them forward in new modern interpretations, but always acknowledging the past and where they have come from. To be able to inspire others makes what I create worthwhile. It gives me purpose and it encourages me to pursue my passion and follow my dreams. It feeds my creativity and nurtures it at the same time.

I hope you have found this post inspiring and you enjoy this space where I share my creative musings.

Until next time, Happy Stitching

Miss Leela x